Сша powerball официальный сайт

Лотерея powerball australia – официальный сайт лотереи из австралии, билеты и результаты, отзывы, играть онлайн | big lottos

Звуковое лото – Деревенская ласточка

Can non-US citizens play? What if a non-US citizen wins?

Yes, non-US citizens can legally play, and non-US citizens are eligible to win any prize offered in the game.

If a non-US citizen wins, they would claim their prize in the same manner that a US citizen would, but the taxes withheld would be different. For example, federal withholding for non-US citizens is a flat 30%.  Also, individual states may have different tax structures for non-US citizens than they do for US citizens.  Depending on which country the person is a legal resident of, there also may be tax treaties between the US and that other country which could be helpful in offsetting whatever the US tax liabilities are.

In short, non-US citizens can play and win Powerball.  If a non-US citizen wins a large prize, they will be responsible for some amount of tax, which in the end will probably be an amount similar to what a US citizen would pay, but there are so many possible variations with international tax codes that you’ll need to consult with a local tax attorney if you need to know a precise amount of tax liability.

Prizes and Odds of Winning

You win prizes by matching the numbers you picked to the winning ones drawn. There are fixed prizes in eight of the nine divisions, so you know exactly how much you will receive. The only prize that changes is the jackpot, which starts at a minimum of $40 million (approximately R560 million) and rolls over to the next draw when it is not won. The jackpot is shared if there are multiple winners.

The following table shows the prizes you can win, what they’re worth with each of the Power Play multipliers, and the odds of winning:

USA Powerball Prizes and Odds
Prize Division Numbers Matched Odds of Winning Prize With 2x Power Play With 3x Power Play With 4x Power Play With 5x Power Play With 10x Power Play
1 5 + Powerball 1 in 292,201,338 Jackpot Jackpot Jackpot Jackpot Jackpot Jackpot
2 5 1 in 11,688,054 $2 million $2 million $2 million $2 million $2 million $2 million
3 4 + Powerball 1 in 913,129 $50,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $500,000
4 4 1 in 36,525 $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $1,000
5 3 + Powerball 1 in 14,494 $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $1,000
6 3 1 in 580 $7 $14 $21 $28 $35 $70
7 2 + Powerball 1 in 701 $7 $14 $21 $28 $35 $70
8 1 + Powerball 1 in 92 $4 $8 $12 $16 $20 $40
9 0 + Powerball 1 in 38 $4 $8 $12 $16 $20 $40
*The overall odds of winning a Powerball prize are 1 in 18

USA Powerball prizes are subject to differing levels of tax depending on where you play the game. For players in the USA, a federal tax of at least 24 percent is withheld on any prize greater than $5,000, while some states also withhold their own tax on winnings. If you play the game from South Africa, you could also be taxed on Powerball prizes. Go to the Taxes page for more information.

Why is the cash option different than the advertised jackpot?

The Powerball jackpot is an estimated 29-year annuity value, with a total 30 payments (the first payment happens right away, followed by 29 annual payments).  When players choose
the annuity option for their prize, the state lottery pays the prize out over 29 years (30 payments) by
buying U.S. Government Treasury Securities, which earn interest and mature annually over
the 29 years.  That annual return is the amount the winners receive each year for the
29 year period.  With the cash option, the state lottery will take the amount of
money that would have been invested and will pay it directly to the winner in one
payment.  Both payment options have federal and applicable state taxes deducted
from them, although with an annuity option you pay taxes gradually on each annual payout, not all at once like with the cash option.

Оцените статью